Quiche Lorraine

You’re looking at 5 strips of bacon. Bacon smells sooooo good when you cook it. I mean, what  isn’t there to love? Fatty pork cooked in its own fat….yummmmy.

In Julia Child’s recipe, she says to boil the bacon before browning. Why? To get rid of the smokey smell. Now who would want to do that? And, it wasn’t just bacon, it was Trader Joe’s applewood smoked bacon. Who would want to get rid of the applewood smoke flavor? So we skipped the boiling! How un-Frenchish of us.

Butter cubed. There’s more than one stick here, and underneath that pile of butter, is a pile of shortening. I knew the second I put all that in a bowl that the crust was going to be DELICIOUS. And yes, it was!

So a bunch of butter, shortening, cream, and bacon later, here’s our very first quiche! Yeah, I know the sides are not perfect, but the flavor was good (although I don’t really know what a proper quiche Lorraine is supposed to taste like). It was like biting down into a fluffy light egg, with a hint of smokey delicious bacon.

The crust came out GREAT. Buttery and flaky! The process of making the crust was something called a fraisage. It was easier than I thought it would be. I’m glad my dough didn’t come out too sticky.

Before:


After:

Now, when you cook a quiche it’s supposed to puff up and brown a bit. Now, I don’t know how much puff is defined as “puffed up”, but it puffed a LITTLE I think, so close enough. I really really hope I don’t run into this problem when I try a souffle (I have my eye on the vanilla or almond dessert souffle next).

Unfortunately for me, we didn’t realize that the little 8″ quich we made only needed about 1-cup of flour’s worth of dough. We just followed the dough recipe that the recipe pointed us to. So now I have the remaining half ball of fat sitting in the fridge, and I’m trying to figure out what to do with it. I don’t think Dickson can handle another cream/bacon explosion from Quiche Lorraine.

This entry was posted in Cooking, Food, Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Bookmark the permalink.

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